Knees Caving In On The Squat Acceptable? (Video)

A common mistake made while squatting is knee caving. If the knees cave in when you squat you are putting your knees at risk. Overall strengthening is necessary but there are some specific areas you should pay attention to in order to get the best results. The video above was provided by Candito Training HQ.

Another common flaw in squatting is knee caving, especially when coming out of the hole.

Now, we could argue biomechanics until we’re blue in the face. Is it weak adductors? Weak glutes? Weak hammies? And depending on what research we’re looking at, almost any of those answers could be valid. For now, though, I’m with functional movement guru Gray Cook — instead of isolating a muscle, let’s just try and correct the pattern.

Knee caving, like losing your low back arch, reflects the idea of an energy leak.

Now, I know what some of you are going to say: “But I’ve seen world class Olympic lifters squat that way and they aren’t injured!”

First off, you don’t know that they aren’t injured. World-class athletes are quite often paid to compete, so they’re willing and/or forced to train through a lot of things they probably shouldn’t train through.

Second, and I hate to be the one to break this to you, but you probably aren’t world class. Remember that a lot of the best strength athletes in the world are at the top merely because they’re genetically predisposed to handle ridiculous training volumes and programs.

Just because they do it, and can get away with it, doesn’t mean you should.

Solution: Use bands to re-groove your squat pattern.

This is a simple tip that works time and again. Take a mini-band from EliteFTS and double it up around your knees. As you sit back/down, make sure to keep your knees out. Ideally, maintain a neutral alignment between your feet, knees, and hips.

If you’re used to letting your knees cave, it may take a little while to get the hang of it, but you’ll be rewarded, again, with safer squats and more weight on the bar.

via T-NationCandito Training HQ

 

 

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